Tag Archives: Roma

rewind.

I’ve been home almost two weeks. The buzz questions haven’t gotten overwhelming yet, but that may be because I’ve been hiding in my room trying to make up for lost down time this semester. I may be an extrovert, but I think I found my hidden introvert.

Anyway, my favorite (NOT) questions to be asked are:

1) Did you like Italy? (Isn’t that a loaded question)

2) What was your favorite part? – and when I can’t answer that…

3) Favorite place?

4) And last but certainly not least: What was your least favorite part?

Now that I’ve been home for a bit I’ve had time to think and I may actually be able to share a few things, so keep reading if you like answers to open-ended questions. (Sorry for going out of order, but it’s for literary purposes.)

What was your least favorite part?

I was really really sick on and off for about eight weeks while I was in Rome.. I recently found out my “disease” was most likely mono, but during the time I just thought I was dying. It actually became a joke over our spring break trip as I hacked my lungs out of my body, woke everyone up in the middle of the night, and could no longer breath normally (not to mention the fire breathing dragon who had an amazing lung capacity that was lodged in my throat). Spring Break was no less magical, but it definitely helped me learn what perseverance was. Besides feeling like death (because that puts anyone in a damper) my least favorite part was the time change. Do you know how difficult it is to talk to your friends when they are on a 7-hour time difference? Well I’ll tell you, it’s really hard. I think I Skyped people a grand total of five times over the five months I was abroad.

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me while dying

What was your favorite part?

There are so many options and I don’t really think I can choose a single favorite, because that would be so unfair to all the other incredible things, so I’ll highlight a few.

1. The views – they were completely breathtaking – not just in Italy but every city I went to. It’s a whole lot different than the good ole’ US of A, but that’s probably why I loved it. It was more intricate; the buildings were stable, the designs mesmerizing, and always conveniently located by a river. I made a point of climbing a mountain everywhere I went, and it definitely paid off.

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Firenze (Duomo)
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Copenhagen (The Round Tower)
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(piazza del popolo)
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Budapest

2. The Food – If I were actually going to choose a favorite this would probably be it. Pizza and pasta are my life, so this was my food heaven. It was actually acceptable for me to eat one of those every day at multiple meals if I so chose. Also the food in Budapest and Greece. So good + cheap. If you ever find yourself in these regions try Goulash in Budapest and Souvlaki in Greece.

meal brought to you by friend and company
meal brought to you by friend and company

3. The Coffee – One of the best things by far was that you paid no more than a euro twenty (roughly $1.50) for a cappuccino. It’s also some of the best coffee you’ll ever have. (Also notice I said cappuccino and not coffee, because if you order coffee you are about to get a shot of the strongest espresso of your life. Not the most pleasant sensation, unless you’re into that sort of the thing then by all means.)

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a typical breakfast

4. Pastries – these may seem like they should go in the food category but that’s not true because in reality they actually fit in the category of “Piece of Heaven”. Sadly I found the best pastry shop only two weeks before the end of the semester. 30 cents for donuts, croissants, and either of the previous two stuffed with your choice of filling. Also, pastries are breakfast in Italy, so don’t be a hater when you see someone eating a cookie for breakfast because maybe they’re from Italy… or they just like cookies.

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fritelle (stuffed donuts – native to Venice)

5. Oh yeah and gelato gets its own category too. So….. Gelato.

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What was your favorite place?

Can I answer with a question? Can I refuse to answer that question? – kidding.

Everywhere I went was different, and asking me to choose a favorite is like asking me to evaluate every culture I went to and pick the best. I’ll give a few highlights ranging from places within Rome and some cool cities.

1. Top of the typewriter – no it’s not food. Its Il Vittoriano the place of the tomb of the unknown soldier, the eternal flame. It’s a building dedicated to the first kind of Rome and if you take the elevator to the top you’ll get the most magnificent 360 degree view.

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The Typewriter
just a sneak peek of the view
Processed with VSCOcam with g3 preset

2. Barnum Café – it was a café in Camp Di Fiori and it reminded me of Nashville.

3. Sicily – the food is filled with more vegetables and meat, there are beaches everywhere, and the people I went with made the trip.

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Cefalu, Sicily

4. Copenhagen – everyone was SO nice. The city is beautiful and it’s a big city feel without the big city attitude.

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Nyhavn

Did I like Italy?

No, I hated it. That’s actually not true at all – I loved Italy, and almost everything about it. There were obviously its ups and downs, but going to Italy was the best decision I’ve made so far in my life (aside from my newly dyed purple and pink hair). But really, sometimes it got tough to be so far from home, feeling like I’d been forgotten by people at school or generally just missing out on their lives, wanting to explore but being so ill I could do nothing but lay in bed. Rome is a gem and lots of people know it. It’s a city full of history, mystery, and some interesting people. The good far outweighed the bad and despite the hard things I came across I always learned something from them (cheesy I know, but oh so true).

So yes, in short (because that’s usually why people ask this question) I did indeed enjoy Italy.

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Mese Uno

Calcio

The slow murmurs and buzz in the air had me entranced. It was methodic and spontaneous all at once. The turf was a vibrant green, freshly manicured and painted. In one collective voice the fans shouted each players last name. You could hear the excitement and dedication in each declaration. The vibrant red jerseys popped off the field so you could see every intricate move the players made. As the anthem started every scarf was raised in adoration. Roma! Roma! Roma! Each voice melded with the next. I couldn’t have imagined anything more beautiful in that moment than this group of people united by love of the game.

-a.marlo